Why Brochures Are Still Effective

Why Go Old School?

 

We tend to think that a website can replace a printed brochure in the age of e-mail, multimedia presentations, and the internet. Today’s printers print more sophisticated marketing materials than ever. Opening the mail or reading printed fabric is a welcome diversion to many people—and an opportunity for you.

 

Here Are Some Interesting Facts

 

Let’s face it, letters are hard to read with only the sender’s logo and signature to break up the blocks of text. A cover letter or business card sent to a prospect can make a quick impression. Still, they only present a fraction of the information about your company. Meeting potential clients in person takes time and effort, and you need to be creative in your introduction.

 

Brochures play an Important Part

 

Brochures are a great way to package and deliver a lot of information about yourself, your business, and your expertise. Brochures can be given to current clients for referrals or left in various locations.

 

What is a Brochure?

 

Simple two-fold brochures on 8 1/2 x 11 paper include elaborate 9 x 12 pocket folders with pages stitched in and insert sheets. In the past, several sizes have evolved to fit mail envelopes or printing presses.

 

To make a great first impression, a good brochure design involves careful analysis of your target market, the level of sophistication required, and your market niche. Finally, your brochure should leave a potential client with something they don’t want to throw away.

 

Brochures: Starting Out

 

If you’ve never made a brochure before, start by collecting samples of various quality levels, from simple one- and two-color on textured stock to slick 4-color glossy brochures.

 

Asking yourself what makes a brochure appealing and effective will help you create a brochure for your own business that conveys the message and sophistication you require.

 

Next, write a basic business brochure. Even if you’re not a professional writer, putting your ideas and facts on paper will help you clarify what your brochure needs to say.

 

When Writing the Brochure

 

Is my firm a market leader?

Do I have a market niche?

What sets my firm apart from the rest?

Better value, service, or product selection?

Is there anything new to promote?

 

Brochure Questions

 

Who is my audience?

What message will entice a potential client?

What types of brochures and sophistication do your clients typically receive?

Do you need photos or illustrations to promote your product or service?

Is the brochure a self-mailer?

Include in your brochure:

Postal address

Phone No (and 800 number if you have one).

No. fax

e-mail

URL.

 

Avoid including information that may change in the next 12 months. Also, avoid using a specific person’s name as a contact unless you know they won’t leave in the next year. The same goes for printing people’s photos. It’s pointless to spend thousands of dollars on a brochure that becomes obsolete because someone leaves the company.

 

How Much Does a Brochure Cost?

 

Brochures can cost hundreds to thousands of dollars. As a result of the numerous variables involved in creating a brochure, it is difficult to estimate the final costs until all specifications are determined.

 

These extras can be worth the money if they enhance your brochure and the image you want to project. Also, consider whether you need professional photography or assistance writing or editing your brochure copy.

 

Even if you don’t know everything about your brochure, it’s a good idea to create a budget. Begin by estimating how many brochures you’ll need over the next year, including mailings and sales meetings. A designer can use a brochure with similar information and photographs to determine printing and production costs.

 

Postage is another factor in brochure design. Larger brochures cost more to mail, so if you plan to do a large mailing as part of your marketing, consider a smaller brochure. Larger brochures often get tangled in other mail and get lost in the mail stream. Brochures that fit in a #10 business envelopes are the most cost-effective and safest to mail. It also allows you to mail a cover letter and business card.

 

How to Get Started

 

A brochure design professional will get you on the right track within your budget. Phoenix Blueprints has the experience and expertise you need for an effective brochure. Call 954-708-1100 today for more information.

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